Bone broth has collagen which, when cooked, produces amino acids, the building blocks of protein.

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For centuries, home cooks and chefs have saved beef and poultry bones to concoct a nourishing broth. Bone broth is packed with a plethora of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, iron, vitamins A and K, fatty acids, selenium, zinc and manganese. And, as medicalnewstoday.com pointed out last December, bone broth has collagen which, when cooked, produces amino acids, the building blocks of protein. Thus, bone broth benefits joints and may help keep osteoarthritis at bay, or at least ease symptoms.  

“Nourishing Broth: An Old-Fashioned Remedy for the Modern World,” published by Kaayla T. Daniel in 2014, offers additional broth health benefits: gut healing and weight loss due to high protein content and a satiated feeling after eating.

Medicalnewstoday.com explained why bone broth is highly nutritious: “Simmering the bones … helps release nutrients from the marrow within the bones, as well as break down other tissues into the water.”

Shape magazine in September provided an easy bone broth recipe: Purchase bones from a butcher or at a grocer, or save them from a cooked turkey, whole chicken, beef roast, etc. “Once you have the bones, cram them all into a pot with whatever vegetables (i.e. carrots, celery, onion, etc.) and herbs you have lying around. … Then add water to the top, and simmer on low for at least 20 hours.”

Shape informed that bone broth can be consumed plain, added as the broth to soups, used instead of water to cook a variety of grains and other recipes, and frozen for later use.

Some bone broths are available for sale at supermarkets and specialty food retailers, but broth is not the same as stock. Bon Appétit says broth is “… defined by its thickness (due to gelatin) and exceptionally long cooking time.” Further, achieving a quality, nutritious bone broth requires breaking “down all of the cartilage until there’s a lot of collagen-rich gelatin in that broth.”